We always buy frozen edamame with the best of intentions. But more often than not, we use it for icing our sore joints instead of in a delicious meal. As important as post-workout R&R is, we say it's time to let edamame live up to its full potential. These nine frozen edamame recipes are so tasty (and easy!), you may never end up with extra bags in your freezer again.

Cabbage salads are tricky. The dense veggie produces so many shredded leaves it feels impossible to use them all—especially when recipes call for green and purple varieties. (There's only so much cabbage one can eat!) This salad, however, changes the game. It's so crunchy and satisfying you'll actually look forward to leftovers all week. And since cabbage is so dense, you won't have to worry about it getting flat and lifeless like other lettuce. Another bonus: It tastes good with all kinds of protein. Chicken, shrimp, tofu... you really can't go wrong.

We know: It's hard to get sick of hummus. But for the moments when you are looking for a fresh dip, we say set those chickpeas aside and instead reach for frozen edamame. Made with garlic, olive oil, lemon, and fresh herbs (basil is our fave), this dip will be gone faster than the time it takes to make it. In fact, you may even want to double the recipe (particularly if you're hosting).

Simple, savory, sweet... This salad checks all the boxes. It also makes a snazzy side dish or snack. Simply defrost frozen edamame, toss with cranberries and olive oil, stir in Feta crumbles, and cover with freshly cracked black pepper. We also love stuffing the salad into a pita pocket and adding diced cucumber and red onion to turn it into a full meal.

And speaking of pita pockets, here's another fun spin on the beloved Mediterranean sandwiches. Edamame stands in for chickpeas to create St. Patrick's-worthy falafels (with the help of parsley and scallions too) and is covered in a garlic herb spread and nestled between spinach leaves. Feel free to use whatever sauces you please—hummus, harissa, tzatziki—and get creative with toppings. (Though pickled onions and kalamata olives are a great choice, if we may say so.)

Edamame is often used as a substitute for chickpeas, but in this recipe, they become a protein-packed dream team. (Oh, and peas join the party too.) Simply cook the orzo according to the package, add the frozen ingredients to the pot two minutes before it's done boiling, drain, return to the pot, add the chickpeas and spices, splash with olive oil, and enjoy your comforting bowl of protein-packed goodness. For extra flavor, add a drizzle of thick balsamic or top with red pepper flakes.

We have some serious beef with this recipe. Just kidding. Easy, tasty, and healthy... this recipe can do no wrong. Homemade sauce is splashed on thin strips of flank steak—chicken or shrimp would taste great too—and mixed with broccoli, edamame, and brown rice for a filling and flavorful easy weeknight dinner. Feel free to substitute store-bought teriyaki sauce if you're short on time (or ingredients), but keep an eye out for added sugars—which often accompany store-bought sauces.

Some ingredients are just made for each other—like broccoli and edamame. What strengthens their union even more: Peanut sauce. To make the most of these triple threat flavors, boil or roast broccoli florets, toss with edamame and chopped peanuts, mix in the peanut sauce, and top with scallions and sesame seeds. The perfect side for sautéed chicken breast or tofu, this salad will make anyone a fan of broccoli—yes, even youngins.

Black bean burgers, lentil burgers, mushroom burgers... the list of vegetarian burger options runs deep. But edamame burgers? This was news to our ears—and boy are we glad we heard it. The frozen soybeans are mixed with the likes of sweet potato, garlic, onion, oats, greens, and a heap of spices and sauces (like tahini) to create the most savory veggie burger we ever sank our teeth into. Serve with whole grain mustard, barbecue sauce, hummus, tzatziki, or any other accoutrements, and feel free to freeze the leftovers (they thaw like champs).

Zucchini shouldn't have all the fun. This recipe skips the squash and opts for crunchy cucumber as it's spiralized veggie of choice. Mixed with red bell pepper, jalapeño, edamame, and a homemade ginger vinaigrette, it's the perfect light dinner after a heavy day of eating—we've all been there—or simple weekday lunch. Add shrimp or salmon for some protein and toasted sesame seeds for a little extra color and flavor.

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